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Saturday, February 28, 2009

The Medicus Trainer and the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - How Do They Work Together?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~The Medicus Trainer and the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - How Do They Work Together?

This article will explain how the Medicus trainer golf club facilitates the famous Stack And Tilt Golf Swing that has been very popular in recent years. In fact about a couple of dozen PGA Tour pros have adopted this swing technique. But first of all we need to discuss what the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing is and subsequently what are its advantages and disadvantages.

The Stack and Tilt Golf Swing

In a nutshell, the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing advocates that a golfer's weight should remain toward the front and not shift to the back during the swing. Another way to look at it is that the head should remain in the same place during the swing. Some golfers have the tendency to "sway" during the golf swing, and in fact this works for some players. But it can only be effective if the golfer can have his club hit the ground at the right spot consistently and if the proper weight transfer occurs which will allow the player to hit the ball squarely. In fact some teaching pros advocate moving the body backward during the swing, especially with the driver, and keeping the body weight and the head position behind the ball in order to generate more power.

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing requires almost the opposite in body position. That is, most of the weight is on the left side, say perhaps 60%, and remains there during the backswing. If you can picture a stick being placed in the ground that touches the golfer's left hip, his left side should remain touching against that stick throughout the swing. This would be for a right handed golfer, and the opposite would be the case for a lefty. If a player swings in such a fashion, his shoulders will be lined up vertically at the top of the backswing and "stacked" over the left hip (again for a right handed golfer). Since the body has turned and the player's back is more or less facing the target, his spine will necessarily tilt somewhat. So that is where the "Stack and Tilt" expression comes from. It would seem to be easier to just think about keeping the head in the same place and making the swing after setting up with about 60% of the player's weight on the front foot.

How Does the Medicus Trainer Facilitate the Stack and Tilt?

The Medicus trainer helps a golfer who wants to emulate the Stack and Tilt swing. The Medicus Trainer has been specifically designed to break, or become unhinged, at six different parts of the golf swing if swing faults occur. Here is an article that explains all six of these mechanisms in detail: Medicus Driver. The Medicus trainer aids in attaining a Stack and Tilt movement specifically at the moment of ball impact. That is, if the golfer's weight is positioned too far behind the ball at impact the Medicus trainer will become unhinged. This would be a pretty weird feeling to have the club break just as the ball is being hit. I doubt most golfers would want to repeat that type of thing, and in that way the Medicus almost forces the golfer to correct his swing fault.

Why Bother With All This?

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing was promoted to facilitate hitting the golf ball squarely. If the player's weight is to the rear, it is possible he or she will not be able to successfully transfer weight to the left side (again, for a righty). The result is an open or closed clubface at impact, depending on how the player's body tries to compensate for the error. However, some teaching pros feel that the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing approach is not for everyone. Some high handicap players have too much weight towards their front foot already, and they also do not have the athletic ability to get through the ball squarely. For those players the stack and tilt is a bad idea.

http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-and-fitness-articles/the-medicus-trainer-and-the-stack-and-tilt-golf-swing-how-do-they-work-together-713761.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~The Medicus Trainer and the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - How Do They Work Together?

Friday, February 20, 2009

Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - What Does That Mean?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - What Does That Mean?

There has been a lot of talk over the past few years about the so-called Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. Apparently about two dozen PGA Tour players have adopted it, including some champions like Rick Weir and Zach Johnson, as well as Aussie Aaron Baddeley, among others. This article will explain where the terms stack and tilt come from and what is going on with this approach to the golf swing.

So What's With "Stack and Tilt"?

It is really a catchy little phrase that has worked well for the people who promote and teach it. If you are like I was, you are asking yourself, "what is stacking and what is tilting"? Well, here's an explanation I found while viewing some videos in trying to search for an answer. And by the way the answer is not obvious, in case you are wondering why you can't figure it out for yourself.

Here's the deal- the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing basically says that most of the golfer's weight should be kept on his left side during the swing (about 60%), and also that the player's head should remain pretty much in the same position throughout the swing rather than swaying backwards. His left side should not move backwards much during the backswing but should stay pretty much in the same position it was during set up. In addition, his swing is a bit more upright than flat.

So what does that have to do with Stack And Tilt Golf Swing? Not much, but here's the explanation I found. When the golfer has completed his backswing using the guidelines mentioned, his shoulders are vertically in line with each other approximately over his left hip. So his shoulders are said to be "stacked" at that point. (All discussion in this article refers to a right handed player, so lefties just need to reverse things.) Also, at this point the golfer's back is more or less facing the target, and if his head has been kept in the same place it was at the start of the swing, his spine will necessarily "tilt".

So there you have it, Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. If you think that explanation is a bit obscure, I couldn't agree more, but then again, who cares? It is a catchy little phrase, and the fact that this swing has been adopted by some of the PGA Tour's top players means that it must be bringing something to the party. Let's discuss now why this approach has been adopted and if it should be used by weekend golfers like you and me.

Why Players Go to the Stack and Tilt?

A lot of swing instructors teach that during the backswing it is OK for the head to move backwards a bit, or sway, especially for the driver. Some of these teachers even advocate keeping the head behind the ball to generate more power. The problem with this approach is that sometimes a player cannot fully transfer his weight to the left side at impact, and the club strikes the ball with the face open. Obviously this means a pushed shot to the right. All this is true with the other clubs in the bag as well, not just the driver. So if you are a player who seems to consistently push shots off to the right, this approach might be worth a try.

Who Should Not Use the Stack and Tilt?

As we all know, some recreational golfers don't have the prettiest or the most effective swings (to put it in the form of understatement). Some in fact keep way too much of their body weight on the left side as it is. So here you have some players that already have too much weight on the left side and who cannot get through the ball squarely at impact. Trying to exaggerate this even more will not help those golfers. So you have to be aware of your weight distribution at set-up, how squarely you get through the ball, and whether you are prone to pushing shots.

Give it a Shot

So if you are in fact a golfer that has a problem with pushing a lot of shots, it is easy to give this swing approach a try. Don't worry about "stacking" and "tilting", just address the ball with about 60% of your weight on your left side. Imagine there is a stick or something touching your left hip at address. Keep you left side touching that stick throughout the swing, and you have just tried the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. Think about not moving your head backward during the backswing, and this will help. Try it on the range first, of course, and develop a little muscle memory. Despite the name, the stack and tilt is not a big mystery and is easy to try.

One last word, there a lot of short videos on YouTube which discuss the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. They are worth a look if you want to pursue this.

http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-and-fitness-articles/stack-and-tilt-golf-swing-what-does-that-mean-667329.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - What Does That Mean?

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Stack and Tilt: The ultimate cure for our swing problems?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt: The ultimate cure for our swing problems?

The Stack and Tilt golf swing was first heard of in early 2007 when professional golfers like Australia’s Aaron Baddeley or former Masters Champion Mike Weir (Canada) started to use it. In the meantime, more than 20 other touring professionals have used the Stack and Tilt swing to (re-)boost their careers. The new approach was developed after 20 years of research by swing teachers Andy Plummer and Mike Bennet. A fundamental element of a conventional golf swing is the weight shift to the right foot (for a right-handed player) during the backswing and to the left foot during the downswing. With the Stack and Tilt method, a player will set up with at least 60 per cent of his weight on his front foot. During the swing, the left shoulder will move down instead of laterally and even more weight will be put on the front foot resulting in an 80/20 weight distribution at the top of the backswing.

The benefit of the Stack and Tilt obviously is the lack of weight shift and in consequence less body movement than with a traditional motion. The spine stays vertical over the ball through the whole swing. According to Plummer and Bennet, this enables the player to achieve a more solid contact with the ball, a more penetrating ball flight and better consistency.
Of course there is also a potential downside of the Stack and Tilt methodology for the average player: When you already lean too much on your front foot and have a hard time coming from the inside (i.e. you are probably fighting a slice or a pull), the Stack and Tilt will most likely only worsen your problems.

Stack and Tilt: Success Stories
Here are some of the PGA Tour Pros who are successfully using the Stack and Tilt swing:

Mike Weir
Aaron Baddeley
Dean Wilson
Tommy Armour III
Eric Axley
Charlie Wie
Will MacKenzie

Check out the swing of left-handed golfer Eric Axley in this video:





Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt: The ultimate cure for our swing problems?

Sunday, February 8, 2009

Do you Know the Steps of a Golf Swing?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Do you Know the Steps of a Golf Swing?

There are 6 basic steps in the golf swing that each golfer should be aware prior to each golf shot. Step number 1 is body alignment relative to the target. Start by standing 2 to 3 yards behind the golf ball, with your body and the ball forming a straight line to the target. Pick out a guiding target directly behind and directly in front of the golf ball that is in the line your body and the golf make toward the target. These targets could be anything on the ground inches in front and behind the golf ball like leaves, grass, a broken tee, whatever. Focus on these ground targets that fall on the line you picked out to the target as you approach the golf ball.

Align the club face behind the ball, with the center of the club face on a direct line between the two ground targets you have selected. Grip the club with just enough tension to keep it from slipping in your hands throughout the course of the golf swing. Align your feet on a parallel plane with your ground targets, shoulder width apart, and the knees slightly bent. The front foot should be pointed slightly outward, toward the target, to allow your hips to flow freely through the swing.

Your upper body should tilt a bit toward the ball while keeping good posture. Your arms should hang loosely in front of your body to loosely grip the golf club. Your shoulders should line up parallel with the golf ball to target line and your toes. Your head should tilt down with your eyes on the back of the golf ball where you want the club head to impact it. This part of the golf swing is known as the setup or addressing the ball.

This element of the golf swing is the back swing or take away. Your back elbow should remain closely tucked to your ribs as you slowly take the golf club back. The golf club should remain on a straight line along the plane of your alignment toward the target on the ground. The front arm should remain straight throughout this part of the swing and always keep your eye on the back of the golf ball where you want the club face to impact the ball. This back swing motion should instinctively place your chin into your front shoulder. Your hips should stay still and tilted a bit, while your front knee will turn in. At the top of your back swing, your wrists should cock a little. This allows for a more powerful down swing and more distance on your golf shot.

Bring the club downward toward the ball, uncoiling the wrists, and shifting your weight onto your front foot. You should attempt to generate force and speed on your down swing, while never taking the club face off of the target line. Upon making contact with the ball, the club face should strike the ground as it moves through, taking a divot from the ground in the area past where the ball was lying, and through your second ground target.

The finish will generate a bit more distance if done properly. Follow through the golf swing with a high follow through of the golf club. Your rotation of the hips should have turned them directly toward your target. Since your weight will shift, it should now be squarely on your front leg. You should now be seeing your golf ball soaring toward your target in a nice arcing trajectory.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/do-you-know-the-steps-of-a-golf-swing-319850.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Do you Know the Steps of a Golf Swing?

Elements of a Golf Swing

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Elements of a Golf Swing

Golfers should have a mental check list of some of the basic elements of the golf swing before attempting a shot. The golfers body alignment relative to the target is the first basic element. To do this, stand about 5 to 10 feet behind the golf ball. The golf ball should form a straight line with yourself and the intended target. Pick out some targets on the ground to help guide you such as a shadow, tuft of grass, leaf, or whatever you can find. These should be a short distance in front of and behind the golf ball that give you a straight line with you, the golf ball, and the target you are aiming at. As you get into your address position over the golf ball, keep that line on the ground to the target in your site.Visit to : http://golfclub-review.blogspot.com

Align the club face behind the ball, with the center of the club face on a direct line between the two ground targets you have selected. Grip the club with just enough tension to keep it from slipping in your hands throughout the course of the golf swing. Align your feet on a parallel plane with your ground targets, shoulder width apart, and the knees slightly bent. The front foot should be pointed slightly outward, toward the target, to allow your hips to flow freely through the swing.
Tilt your torso slightly towards the ball while keeping your back straight. The arms should now hang freely in front of the body to grip the club. The shoulders should be parallel with the ground targets and the toes, and your head should be tilted downward with your eyes on the ball. These motions described are known as the set-up, or addressing the ball.http://golfclub-review.blogspot.com
The back swing is step 4 of the golf swing. It is also known as the take away. This will be the start of the meat and potatoes of the golf swing. You want to rhythmically take the golf club back on the same plane of the straight line that your ground targets make. Make sure to keep your back elbow close to your ribs. The front elbow should be straight during the back swing. Your eyes should remain on the back of the golf ball, where you want to strike it with the golf club face. The back swing should inherently bring your chin into your front shoulder. The hips will stay quite and tilted a small amount forward. The front knee should also turn inward. At the height of the back swing, you should allow your wrists to break slightly to get ready for the next step of the golf swing.
Step 5 of the golf swing is the down swing. During this element of the golf swing, you will be bringing the golf club down toward the ball on the same plane with the line formed by the ground targets you have setup directly in front and behind the golf ball. The wrists will start uncoiling and your weight will be shifting from the back foot to the front foot. This part of the golf swing will produce the speed and force to carry the golf ball toward the target. Keep the golf club face on the target line throughout the down swing and your eyes always on the back of the golf ball. The golf club face should strike the golf ball and then the ground directly in front of where the golf ball was resting. This will take a divot out of the ground approximately where your ground target was located directly in front of where the golf ball was resting.

Finish the golf swing with a nice, high follow through of the club. Your hips should be turned toward the target. Your weight should have shifted, and should now be firmly on your front foot. Smile and watch the ball fly toward the target. http://golfclub-review.blogspot.com

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/elements-of-a-golf-swing-653149.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Elements of a Golf Swing

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Why the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Can Help Your Game

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Why the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Can Help Your Game

Since its inception in early 2007, when PGA Tour professionals like Will MacKenzie, Aaron Baddeley or former Masters champion Mike Weir started using it, the notion of the Stack and Tilt golf swing has been increasingly popular among professional players and weekend hackers alike.

The fathers of the new golf swing are swing teachers Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett, who came up with the concept after more than two decades of research. Let me quickly point out the differences between the Stack and Tilt (also abbreviated as S&T) and a conventional golf swing before I will explain why the S&T can help the average amateur player to significantly improve his game.

While the fundamental concept of a conventional golf swing is a weight shift to the back foot during the upswing, a player using the Stack and Tilt swing will place at least 60 percent of his weight on the front foot. During the swing, even more weight will be placed on the front foot resulting in an 80/20 weight distribution at the top of the backswing.

If you are struggling to consistenly make good contact with the golf ball, the Stack and Tilt golf swing can definitely lower your handicap by several strokes: The lack of weight shift and in consequence reduced body movement will make it easier to achieve a solid contact with the golf ball and will result in a more penetrating ball flight and improved consistency.

Even though players like Tiger Woods or Phil Mickelson have not yet changed to the S&T, it is certainly a concept worth a look for amateur players looking to easily improve their long game.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/why-the-stack-and-tilt-golf-swing-can-help-your-game-719104.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Why the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Can Help Your Game

Sunday, February 1, 2009

Stack Tilt Golf Swing - the Swing That Will Change Your Game

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~the Swing That Will Change Your Game

The concept is rather easy, stack your weight and tilt to the target. The Stack & Tilt swing has convinced many, that this method holds the key to more consistency and power. But is this swing for everyone? Let's look at this swing closer and what type of golfer would most benefit.

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing innovators Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett have pioneered a concept that is truly revolutionizing the golf swing. They have rolled out a method that has convinced some of the best golfers in the world to change their bread and butter... their swing. Not an easy task! The results have been quite astounding. Many PGA players are now either using, or considering using this swing with the same thing in mind. To gain consistency and power.

For the better player, it holds many possibilities to improve the swing. But for some, it may not quite hold as much promise...

If you are thinking of trying this swing and struggle with an "outside-in" path, a problem that plagues many beginners, you may want to reconsider. A player that struggles with a fault that results in an "over the top" swing path would probably only exaggerate the problem by changing swings. You would be better off trying to correct the fault before making such drastic changes.

If you are a better player that "hangs back" and struggles with pushes and hooks, read on. This swing definitely holds opportunities for improvement.

For the better player that already has a solid foundation and only wants to gain more distance or better control for his irons, the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing may be just the ticket. The swing emphasizes the "position at impact" to help improve ball striking consistency. Because the conventional swing uses a weight shift to both sides during the swing, players very often get "caught" with their weight on the back foot. This causes mis-hits and tops.

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing centers your weight over the ball and promotes minimal weight shift, continually remaining centered is the goal. The result is a steeper angle of attack with a flatter and more rotational swing. This provides an element of consistency, especially with irons where your angle of attack needs to be steeper.

So if you struggle with an "over the top" swing path, correct the problem before moving onto this swing methodology. If however, you are a better player that struggles with the occasional push and/or hook, you will want to seriously consider the Stack & Tilt swing. It provides you the opportunity to add an element of consistency you may not find in the conventional swing.


Article Source:
http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/stack-tilt-golf-swing-the-swing-that-will-change-your-game-624350.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~the Swing That Will Change Your Game

Learn the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Learn the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing?

Have you heard about the Stack and Tilt golf swing?

Well, thanks to two men by the names of Andy Plumber and Mike Bennett (who are currently teaching golfers their unbelievable golf swing method on and off the PGA tour) there is now a new way to swing your golf club. The stack and tilt golf swing was formed by who invented the swing "stack and tilt" to help all players find their proper golf form and to use the stack and tilt golf swing to hit the ball correctly each and every time.

Today there are over 18 pro golfers including Aaron Baddeley (who are currently playing on the PGA golf tour) that are using this type of golf swing! Why? Because they feel that they have more control over their golf swing and they are having success with it. The stack and tilt golf swing can help you drive the ball longer and will make you much more comfortable as you swing your golf club.

This method of golf swing requires you to turn your shoulders in a circle, so you always hit the ground under the ball in the exact same spot each and every time. As well as moving the shoulders the spine is moving too, the spine is tilting as you move to hit the golf ball.

This is revolutionary stuff, because we as golfers have always been told to keep the shoulders straight and not to move them. The reason why this golf swing method is called the Stand and Tilt is because your stacked up at a hips and to stay stacked your tilting your spine.

Article Source:
http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/learn-the-stack-and-tilt-golf-swing-676468.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Learn the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing Video

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack And Tilt Golf Swing Video


Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - Click here for more home videos

Golf Life Television and Hitgolf com interview Michael Bennett the co inventor of the popular new swing on the PGA Tour The Stack and Tilt Bennett and his partner researched golf swings and body mechanics to arrive at this golf swing philosophy that has been very successful with many PGA tour professionals like Dean Wilson Mike Wier and Arron Baddeley

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack And Tilt Golf Swing Video