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Monday, April 20, 2009

Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Breakdown









Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Breakdown

Stack and Tilt vs. Rotary Golf Swing

Many golfers have been asking me what the difference is between the "Stack and Tilt" swing taught by Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett and the "Rotary Swing" that I teach from my book, "The Rotary Swing." For those of you who like many of the concepts of the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing, but are unsure about the more questionable aspects of the golf swing, you are in luck. The Rotary Swing shares many similar principals with the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing, but balances out the less desirable traits that are either difficult for the average golfer to perform or potentially stressful on the lower back, especially for those who are less flexible.

Address Position

At address, it is unlikely that you would see any differences between a Rotary Swinger and a Stack and Tilter. You will notice that both golf swings will have a slightly more tilted over spine angle at address compared to the traditional more upright swinger of the club. This angle is flexible, but is in the range of 30-35* when viewed from down the line. Viewed from face on, both golfers will have a spine that is basically vertical with very little "axis tilt" away from the target, if any.

At address, both swings share a similar starting positiong. The difference in the arm angles at address is mostly due to the longer club being demonstrated on the right.

Ball Position

Ball position is also very similar. My preference is for the ball to played approximately off the logo of your shirt, or off the target side ear. Of course, this can be adjusted for club length. The Stack and Tilt swinger will have the ball in a very similar position, although they may tend to play the ball back slightly behind the left ear as one of their swing objectives is to have what they refer to as the "Swing Centers" in front of the ball at impact. The Swing Centers basically refers to the center of the hips, chest and head. You can see the differences in ball position in the photo below.

Backswing

The backswings of the Stack and Tilt and Rotary Swings are also very similar. In both cases, you will see the club travel slightly to the inside of the hands when the club is parallel to the ground and follow a generally shallower swing plane and more inside path to the top of the backswing. This allows both swings to have a steeper shoulder turn going back and a more connected and shorter position at the top which dramatically increases clubhead control and accuracy. However, it is also at this point that we start to see the first main differences in the two golf swings. The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing instructors want for the spine to shift and angle toward the target at the top of the backswing, thus increasing weight on the lead leg. In the Rotary Swing, our main objective is to turn around a somewhat fixed point, the spine, and maintain that angle throughout most of the swing. Because the spine is located at the back of the torso and not at the center, when you turn around your spine, the mass of your torso moves slightly to the right, similar to a door on its hinges. This natural pivot of the body allows an ample turn by anyone of average flexibility and athletic ability. The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing move requires much more flexibility and athletic ability to achieve their desired position at the top, and more importantly, to recover from this position during the downswing.
Notice in both takeaways that the club moves to the inside on a shallower plane and is slightly inside the hands while the left arm is angling in towards the body.
At the top of the swing, both swings appear very similar to the casual observer, however, there are significant differences. Note that the Rotary Swinger on the left maintains flex in the right leg, whereas the Stack and Tilt golfer straightens the leg as he leand further into his left side. If you were to view this from face on, you would also see a spine angle that has not changed from address for the Rotary Swinger, whereas Bennett and Plummer want the spine to lean toward the target at the top of the swing. Note that both swings share a position where the left arm is on the same plane as the shoulders and a right arm that is close to the body.

Downswing & Follow Through

As mentioned in the Backswing section, the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing puts the golfer in what would be commonly referred to as a "reverse pivot" at the top of the swing, whereas the Rotary Swing would be in what I would call a "centered pivot". Because of the severe angles created at the top of the backswing, the Stack and Tilter must make a compensatory move to keep from sticking the club straight down in to the ground on the downswing. Plummer and Bennett refer to this move as feeling as if you are jumping up and thrusting your hips forward during the downswing. This move is very effective at shallowing out the steep angles they've created during the backswing, but requires great athleticism, flexibility and timing to ensure solid contact. The other significant issue of this move is that it puts undue stress on the lower back because the "thrusting" of the hips forward puts the body in the classic "Reverse C" follow through position that has ruined many golfers backs as they tried to imitate the likes of Johnny Miller and Jack Nicklaus in their prime. The Rotary Swing's main goal from the top of the backswing is simple to "unwind". There is no jumping or thrusting, simply an unwinding of the torso while maintaining the spine angle established at address. This puts the golfer in a tall and stacked position in the follow through with the hips more undearneath the torso which is as gentle on the back as you can get.
Both the Rotary Swing and Stack & Tilt share very similar impact positions and fundamentals.

The follow through positions and swing plane of the two golf swings is identical when viewed from down the line.
Into the finish, both swings are nearly identical once again, the only difference that can only be slightly seen from this angle by the educated observer is that the hips are more "underneath" the Rotary Swing who has a taller finish, whereas the Stack and Tilt golfer has the hips more driven toward the target, creating the reverse C follow through advocated by Plummer and Bennett.
During the downswing, you can see how the Stack and Tilt golfer on the right has moved his head in front of the ball whereas the Rotary Swinger on the left keeps his head behind the ball during the downswing and into impact. Keeping the head behind the ball at impact is a position that is consistant with all the top golfers of any era, from Ben Hogan to Tiger Woods. When a golfer tends to "get out in front of the ball" at impact as demonstrated here by Aaron Baddeley, directional control can become difficult as pushes and snap hooks are a typical result.

This article addresses a few of the main differences between the Rotary Golf Swing and the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing and hopefully helps you the golfer make a more informed decision when deciding which golf swing is most appropriate for you. For more information about the Rotary Swing, visit www.RotarySwing.com. If you would like to learn how to perform the Rotary Swing and have access to over 100 instructional golf videos online, visit http://www.OnePlaneGolfSwing.com/oneplanemembers

Chuck Quinton is a golf instructor and professional golfer out of Windermere, FL who has produced two top selling golf instructional DVD's, "Swing Plane Made Simple" and "Short Game Made Simple", and is the author of the new book, "The Rotary Swing." He has published over 100 instructional golf videos and articles on his popular golf instructional website, www.RotarySwing.com

http://www.oneplanegolfswing.com/stack_and_tilt.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Breakdown

Friday, April 10, 2009

Stack and Tilt - The Golf Swing of the Future

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt - The Golf Swing of the Future

The Stack and Tilt golf swing has widely been acclaimed as the golf swing of the future. Many PGA tour players are adopting this golf swing mainly for the consistency it brings to their games. If PGA tour players are using this new swing, can it also help the recreational player?

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing was developed by swing teachers Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett and is considered somewhat of a revolutionary golf swing that keeps your weight stacked over the ball for better ball contact.

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing is based on simple concepts, but certainly deviates from conventional swing standards. The biggest difference between the two swings is weight shift. The conventional swing emphasizes a weight shift. The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing on the other hand, keeps the body over the ball and your weight stays on the front foot throughout the swing.

What does the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing bring to the table? As previously mentioned, consistency is the biggest benefit. Increased distance is another rave. A main component of this new swing is to "load up" on the left side. When you can fully load a shot and a good release follows, increased distance will be the result. Another aspect is a simpler golf swing with less moving parts. The conventional golf swing has been labeled complex and subsequently difficult to repeat.

So which PGA tour players made the switch to the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing? Aaron Baddeley and Mike Weir are two of the better known players to praise and change to the swing. Some others include Dean Wilson, Charlie Wi, and Eric Axley. But it certainly doesn't stop there. Many other tour players are beginning to see this as a swing that will bring a consistency to their games.

Recreational players can definitely benefit from this golf swing. Simplifying the golf swing should be the goal of every golfer. Yes, it does introduce different mechanics to the swing. But a simpler, repeatable golf swing should in theory, be easier to learn and teach. If this swing can simply be another method of teaching the golf swing, it would become more widely accepted. Certainly not every golfer should go out and change their swing. Some golfers would benefit more than others from the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing while others would be better to learn the conventional swing. But allowing golfers to choose one method over another would in my opinion, provide a betterment for the game.

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing definitely has a place in golf. Any golfer looking to add consistency and distance to their game, should seriously look at this swing method. It is certainly a swing of the future.

Are you ready to change your swing to add new found consistency, power and simplicity? If so, visit Stack And Tilt Golf Swing to find out your next step!

For reviews of the latest instructional methods and books for a total improvement plan of your golf game, visit http://www.Golf-Improvement-Tips.com for a one-stop place for your golf improvement goals.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Dan_DeRoeck

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt - The Golf Swing of the Future

Monday, March 30, 2009

Understanding the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Understanding the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing

In a recent issue of Golf Digest (June 2007) a “new” golf swing has been described as the hottest thing on the PGA tour, and its proponents, Andy Plummer and Mike Bennet, have been hailed as the newest golf gurus. The new swing is called the “Stack and Tilt” swing.

In describing the Stack and Tilt swing, Peter Morrice, the author of the article, indulges in a bit of overstatement when he says “Their secret…contradicts almost everything being taught in the game today.” But is this swing really that unique?

The Key Difference

The major difference with the “Stack and Tilt” swing is that it encourages the golfer to keep his weight on his or her front foot during the entire swing. In other words, it does away with the idea that there should be a “weight shift” during the backswing. With the Stack and Tilt swing the golfer starts with about 60% of his or her weight on the front foot, and actually shifts more weight to the front when taking the club back.

Some older golfers will think this looks like a “reverse pivot” where the golfer seems to be leaning towards the target at the top of the swing. Teachers of the typical modern swing have their golf students draw the club back and stack their weight over their back leg when the club hits the top of the swing. But Stack and Tilt encourages the golfer to lean towards the target while the club is taken up.

Subtle Differences

It may be hard for many golfers to spot the differences at first, but some of these differences are significant. For one thing teachers of the typical modern swing want the back leg to remain slightly flexed at the knee. But with the Stack and Tilt swing the back leg straightens out as it pushes back towards the target. See the photos featured in the Golf Digest article on page 122.

As a result the front side of the body is “stacked” over the front foot, and the trailing side of the body is “tilted” towards the target.

For a comparison with the typical modern swing look at photos of Tiger’s swing of the last few years, or see the photo of V.J. Singh’s swing on page 43 of the same issue of Golf Digest. Singh’s upper body is “stacked” over his back leg at the top of the swing, and the trailing side of his torso is perpendicular to the ground as he pushes his weight back over his back leg. This is quite different from the way the torso is angled towards the target with the Stack and Tilt swing.

Lessons from the Past

If you are familiar with the teachings of most modern golf coaches this may sound like a radical departure from golf orthodoxy. But the fact is, there have always been alternative schools of thought which questioned the simplistic “weight shift” idea. In particular, look at old photos of Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan or Sam Snead. None of these golfers make the major shift over the back leg like you see with Tiger Woods, for instance.

Or look closely at the famous 1930s teaching videos featuring Bobby Jones. He does not shift his weight to the back either. He remains centered over the ball throughout the swing and has a much more obvious focus on rotation around the center point rather than the lateral weight shift promoted by most well known modern teachers.

Points of Interest

There are several interesting points made by the the Stack and Tilt advocates which may help the average golfer hit the golf ball more squarely and (perhaps) more powerfully.

The first is the idea of keeping your weight on your front foot. Shifting one’s weight to the back inevitably promotes a shallower swing at the same time as turning the ball into a moving target. This increases the chances of bottoming out too early. Depending on the golfer and the course conditions this can either result in fat shots or thin ones. Pressing into the front foot as you take the club back is a good way to force a steeper approach to the ball and a way to eliminate topping the ball. It also results in a lower trajectory since it results in de-lofting the club face. Unfortunately it also puts more strain on the front knee.

The second point is that Stack and Tilt promotes a flatter swing. A flatter swing is less vertical and more rotational, and is the way Stack and Tilt compensates for being more on top of the ball when the downswing is begun.

The third point is the not-much-discussed idea of the “pelvic thrust” which the Stack and Tilt guys claim is necessary in order to get the club approaching the ball correctly. With Stack and Tilt, since one’s weight and shoulder position are forward, the approach to the ball will be significantly steeper than normal. The pelvic thrust helps to “shallow out” the swing. You achieve this by whipping your hips around and thrusting your lead hip up and towards the target. In other words you have the sensation of jumping up and striking the ball while on your toes. For examples of this see photos of Natalie Golbus or Sergio Garcia, or a younger Gary Player.Bold

If these seem like technical points that are beyond youBoldr level of expertise, just give the “weight forward” idea a try. All you have to do is start witBoldBoldh noticeably more weight on your front foot, and then press into that foot as you take the club up. You will probably find that it feels quite different from what you are used to. This move should result in fewer thin hits. But it may also result in more pushes, especially with the longer clubs, so you may have to adjust the positioning of the ball. You may also find it more physically taxing - requiring more body contortions - and for most of us that is not a good thing.

http://linktree.wordpress.com/2009/01/14/understanding-the-stack-and-tilt-golf-swing/

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Understanding the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing

Friday, March 20, 2009

How to Do a Stack and Tilt Golf Swing

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~How to Do a Stack and Tilt Golf Swing

If you spend any time at all watching The Golf Channel, you've probably become aware of a new way to swing a golf club that has gotten the attention of golfers everywhere. It's called the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing, a technique being promoted by golf coaches Mike Bennett and Andy Plummer. PGA players like Aaron Baddeley, Mike Weir and new-comer Charlie Wi swear by this method and say that it both helps them hit the golf ball farther and improves their accuracy. Learn how to do a stack and tilt golf swing and decide if it is right for your game.

Step1
Be prepared to totally change the way you approach your shots. Instead of shifting your weight to your back foot during your backswing and then moving it to your front foot during your downswing, you will keep your weight on your front foot throughout your swing. In fact, you will move your weight more directly over your front foot during your backswing, anathema to golfers who swing traditionally. This swing is a bit like the “reverse pivot” which older golfers might remember.


Step2
The Stack and Tilt swing requires that you change your leg action. Till now, you have been taught to keep your knees slightly bent throughout the swing and your torso slightly bowed. With the Stack and Tilt swing, your back leg will straighten at the top of your swing, and drive what's left of your weight to your front side during the downswing.

Step3
Press into your front foot at the takeaway and create a steeper backswing than normal. That will result in greater consistency and fewer topped shots; and since your trajectory will be lower, you will hit your tee shots longer because, in most cases, you will improve the ball's run on many fairways.

Step4
Enjoy playing golf more using a Stack and TilBoldt swing because the chances are you will hit the golf ball more squarely and precisely employing the Stack and Tilt swing than the one you are currently using. Furthermore, since your new swing de-emphasizes the weigh shift, you will be less likely to turn your golf ball into a “moBoldving target.” Also, since you will be keeping your weight on the front foot throughout the swing, your swing will be steeper and you will be less likely to hit the ball either fat or thin.


http://www.ehow.com/how_4465284_do-stack-tilt-golf-swing.html


Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~How to Do a Stack and Tilt Golf Swing

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Where to Find Free Golf Tips Online

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Where to Find Free Golf Tips Online

People have been fascinated with mastering the often frustrating game of golf ever since the game was invented back in the 15th century. Since 1750 the game of golf evolved into what we know it as today. Although golf equipment technology and teaching techniques have improved, mastering the game of golf is still as difficult as ever.

Luckily, today we have access to golf tips online with the Internet. Even though I have played golf for over 30 years, I struggled to master the game until a few years ago. With the various golf resources you can search for online, it is now easier to discover the tips that can make a big difference with your game of golf.

There are many excellent paid products, like golf instructional DVD's, golf swing aids, and even some golf e-books that can help you master the game of golf. But, you can also find some valuable free golf tips online as well. Although you sometimes will find that there are many different techniques - especially regarding the grip and the transition from backswing to downswing.

Just try out the different techniques and see what works for you. The golf swing is a fairly complex movement and there are several styles; from the traditional swing to the newer Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. Some online golf tips tell you to grip the club tightly, firmly or even loosely. These terms are quite subjective as to the amount of pressure to use, so just experiment until you find the right grip - I prefer "firmly."

When looking for golf tips online, take into account that there is more to golf than just learning the golf swing. Look for resources that show you the most comprehensive golf tips online. One of the most important areas of golf, that is often ignored, is the mental game of golf. You want free golf tips? First, learn to dominate your inner game of golf.

It is important to know what the right golf equipment is for your type of game (golf clubs and balls.) If you are a novice, look for clubs that are matched for the beginner golfer as they are more forgiving to miss-hits. Buy a driver and fairway woods with a graphite shaft, large titanium head, and perimeter weighting. For the irons, select iron shafts for accuracy, more sole weighting, and wider soles for easier playability. For high handicap golfers or beginners, play a two-piece, firm feel, mid spin golf ball.

Look for golf tips online that cover the whole aspect of golf. Things you need to learn include the grip; setup and stance; backswing, transition, and downswing; driving, fairway shots, chipping, putting, and bunker shots; course management; how to fix problems like the slice, hook, and pull shot; and the different trouble shots you will face - deep rough, hill lies, playing into the wind, etc.

Of course, you can pay a professional golf instructor to learn all these things, but you will end up paying a fortune for dozens of lessons. I would recommend starting out to learn as much as possible with free online golf tips. You could then take a few one-on-one golf lessons and then go to the driving range to practice. Finally, get out on the golf course and play a round of golf - and remember, to master the game of golf, you need to practice - and have fun!

http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/where-to-find-free-golf-tips-online-712699.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Where to Find Free Golf Tips Online

Saturday, February 28, 2009

The Medicus Trainer and the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - How Do They Work Together?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~The Medicus Trainer and the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - How Do They Work Together?

This article will explain how the Medicus trainer golf club facilitates the famous Stack And Tilt Golf Swing that has been very popular in recent years. In fact about a couple of dozen PGA Tour pros have adopted this swing technique. But first of all we need to discuss what the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing is and subsequently what are its advantages and disadvantages.

The Stack and Tilt Golf Swing

In a nutshell, the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing advocates that a golfer's weight should remain toward the front and not shift to the back during the swing. Another way to look at it is that the head should remain in the same place during the swing. Some golfers have the tendency to "sway" during the golf swing, and in fact this works for some players. But it can only be effective if the golfer can have his club hit the ground at the right spot consistently and if the proper weight transfer occurs which will allow the player to hit the ball squarely. In fact some teaching pros advocate moving the body backward during the swing, especially with the driver, and keeping the body weight and the head position behind the ball in order to generate more power.

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing requires almost the opposite in body position. That is, most of the weight is on the left side, say perhaps 60%, and remains there during the backswing. If you can picture a stick being placed in the ground that touches the golfer's left hip, his left side should remain touching against that stick throughout the swing. This would be for a right handed golfer, and the opposite would be the case for a lefty. If a player swings in such a fashion, his shoulders will be lined up vertically at the top of the backswing and "stacked" over the left hip (again for a right handed golfer). Since the body has turned and the player's back is more or less facing the target, his spine will necessarily tilt somewhat. So that is where the "Stack and Tilt" expression comes from. It would seem to be easier to just think about keeping the head in the same place and making the swing after setting up with about 60% of the player's weight on the front foot.

How Does the Medicus Trainer Facilitate the Stack and Tilt?

The Medicus trainer helps a golfer who wants to emulate the Stack and Tilt swing. The Medicus Trainer has been specifically designed to break, or become unhinged, at six different parts of the golf swing if swing faults occur. Here is an article that explains all six of these mechanisms in detail: Medicus Driver. The Medicus trainer aids in attaining a Stack and Tilt movement specifically at the moment of ball impact. That is, if the golfer's weight is positioned too far behind the ball at impact the Medicus trainer will become unhinged. This would be a pretty weird feeling to have the club break just as the ball is being hit. I doubt most golfers would want to repeat that type of thing, and in that way the Medicus almost forces the golfer to correct his swing fault.

Why Bother With All This?

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing was promoted to facilitate hitting the golf ball squarely. If the player's weight is to the rear, it is possible he or she will not be able to successfully transfer weight to the left side (again, for a righty). The result is an open or closed clubface at impact, depending on how the player's body tries to compensate for the error. However, some teaching pros feel that the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing approach is not for everyone. Some high handicap players have too much weight towards their front foot already, and they also do not have the athletic ability to get through the ball squarely. For those players the stack and tilt is a bad idea.

http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-and-fitness-articles/the-medicus-trainer-and-the-stack-and-tilt-golf-swing-how-do-they-work-together-713761.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~The Medicus Trainer and the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - How Do They Work Together?

Friday, February 20, 2009

Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - What Does That Mean?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - What Does That Mean?

There has been a lot of talk over the past few years about the so-called Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. Apparently about two dozen PGA Tour players have adopted it, including some champions like Rick Weir and Zach Johnson, as well as Aussie Aaron Baddeley, among others. This article will explain where the terms stack and tilt come from and what is going on with this approach to the golf swing.

So What's With "Stack and Tilt"?

It is really a catchy little phrase that has worked well for the people who promote and teach it. If you are like I was, you are asking yourself, "what is stacking and what is tilting"? Well, here's an explanation I found while viewing some videos in trying to search for an answer. And by the way the answer is not obvious, in case you are wondering why you can't figure it out for yourself.

Here's the deal- the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing basically says that most of the golfer's weight should be kept on his left side during the swing (about 60%), and also that the player's head should remain pretty much in the same position throughout the swing rather than swaying backwards. His left side should not move backwards much during the backswing but should stay pretty much in the same position it was during set up. In addition, his swing is a bit more upright than flat.

So what does that have to do with Stack And Tilt Golf Swing? Not much, but here's the explanation I found. When the golfer has completed his backswing using the guidelines mentioned, his shoulders are vertically in line with each other approximately over his left hip. So his shoulders are said to be "stacked" at that point. (All discussion in this article refers to a right handed player, so lefties just need to reverse things.) Also, at this point the golfer's back is more or less facing the target, and if his head has been kept in the same place it was at the start of the swing, his spine will necessarily "tilt".

So there you have it, Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. If you think that explanation is a bit obscure, I couldn't agree more, but then again, who cares? It is a catchy little phrase, and the fact that this swing has been adopted by some of the PGA Tour's top players means that it must be bringing something to the party. Let's discuss now why this approach has been adopted and if it should be used by weekend golfers like you and me.

Why Players Go to the Stack and Tilt?

A lot of swing instructors teach that during the backswing it is OK for the head to move backwards a bit, or sway, especially for the driver. Some of these teachers even advocate keeping the head behind the ball to generate more power. The problem with this approach is that sometimes a player cannot fully transfer his weight to the left side at impact, and the club strikes the ball with the face open. Obviously this means a pushed shot to the right. All this is true with the other clubs in the bag as well, not just the driver. So if you are a player who seems to consistently push shots off to the right, this approach might be worth a try.

Who Should Not Use the Stack and Tilt?

As we all know, some recreational golfers don't have the prettiest or the most effective swings (to put it in the form of understatement). Some in fact keep way too much of their body weight on the left side as it is. So here you have some players that already have too much weight on the left side and who cannot get through the ball squarely at impact. Trying to exaggerate this even more will not help those golfers. So you have to be aware of your weight distribution at set-up, how squarely you get through the ball, and whether you are prone to pushing shots.

Give it a Shot

So if you are in fact a golfer that has a problem with pushing a lot of shots, it is easy to give this swing approach a try. Don't worry about "stacking" and "tilting", just address the ball with about 60% of your weight on your left side. Imagine there is a stick or something touching your left hip at address. Keep you left side touching that stick throughout the swing, and you have just tried the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. Think about not moving your head backward during the backswing, and this will help. Try it on the range first, of course, and develop a little muscle memory. Despite the name, the stack and tilt is not a big mystery and is easy to try.

One last word, there a lot of short videos on YouTube which discuss the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing. They are worth a look if you want to pursue this.

http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-and-fitness-articles/stack-and-tilt-golf-swing-what-does-that-mean-667329.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - What Does That Mean?

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Stack and Tilt: The ultimate cure for our swing problems?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt: The ultimate cure for our swing problems?

The Stack and Tilt golf swing was first heard of in early 2007 when professional golfers like Australia’s Aaron Baddeley or former Masters Champion Mike Weir (Canada) started to use it. In the meantime, more than 20 other touring professionals have used the Stack and Tilt swing to (re-)boost their careers. The new approach was developed after 20 years of research by swing teachers Andy Plummer and Mike Bennet. A fundamental element of a conventional golf swing is the weight shift to the right foot (for a right-handed player) during the backswing and to the left foot during the downswing. With the Stack and Tilt method, a player will set up with at least 60 per cent of his weight on his front foot. During the swing, the left shoulder will move down instead of laterally and even more weight will be put on the front foot resulting in an 80/20 weight distribution at the top of the backswing.

The benefit of the Stack and Tilt obviously is the lack of weight shift and in consequence less body movement than with a traditional motion. The spine stays vertical over the ball through the whole swing. According to Plummer and Bennet, this enables the player to achieve a more solid contact with the ball, a more penetrating ball flight and better consistency.
Of course there is also a potential downside of the Stack and Tilt methodology for the average player: When you already lean too much on your front foot and have a hard time coming from the inside (i.e. you are probably fighting a slice or a pull), the Stack and Tilt will most likely only worsen your problems.

Stack and Tilt: Success Stories
Here are some of the PGA Tour Pros who are successfully using the Stack and Tilt swing:

Mike Weir
Aaron Baddeley
Dean Wilson
Tommy Armour III
Eric Axley
Charlie Wie
Will MacKenzie

Check out the swing of left-handed golfer Eric Axley in this video:





Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack and Tilt: The ultimate cure for our swing problems?

Sunday, February 8, 2009

Do you Know the Steps of a Golf Swing?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Do you Know the Steps of a Golf Swing?

There are 6 basic steps in the golf swing that each golfer should be aware prior to each golf shot. Step number 1 is body alignment relative to the target. Start by standing 2 to 3 yards behind the golf ball, with your body and the ball forming a straight line to the target. Pick out a guiding target directly behind and directly in front of the golf ball that is in the line your body and the golf make toward the target. These targets could be anything on the ground inches in front and behind the golf ball like leaves, grass, a broken tee, whatever. Focus on these ground targets that fall on the line you picked out to the target as you approach the golf ball.

Align the club face behind the ball, with the center of the club face on a direct line between the two ground targets you have selected. Grip the club with just enough tension to keep it from slipping in your hands throughout the course of the golf swing. Align your feet on a parallel plane with your ground targets, shoulder width apart, and the knees slightly bent. The front foot should be pointed slightly outward, toward the target, to allow your hips to flow freely through the swing.

Your upper body should tilt a bit toward the ball while keeping good posture. Your arms should hang loosely in front of your body to loosely grip the golf club. Your shoulders should line up parallel with the golf ball to target line and your toes. Your head should tilt down with your eyes on the back of the golf ball where you want the club head to impact it. This part of the golf swing is known as the setup or addressing the ball.

This element of the golf swing is the back swing or take away. Your back elbow should remain closely tucked to your ribs as you slowly take the golf club back. The golf club should remain on a straight line along the plane of your alignment toward the target on the ground. The front arm should remain straight throughout this part of the swing and always keep your eye on the back of the golf ball where you want the club face to impact the ball. This back swing motion should instinctively place your chin into your front shoulder. Your hips should stay still and tilted a bit, while your front knee will turn in. At the top of your back swing, your wrists should cock a little. This allows for a more powerful down swing and more distance on your golf shot.

Bring the club downward toward the ball, uncoiling the wrists, and shifting your weight onto your front foot. You should attempt to generate force and speed on your down swing, while never taking the club face off of the target line. Upon making contact with the ball, the club face should strike the ground as it moves through, taking a divot from the ground in the area past where the ball was lying, and through your second ground target.

The finish will generate a bit more distance if done properly. Follow through the golf swing with a high follow through of the golf club. Your rotation of the hips should have turned them directly toward your target. Since your weight will shift, it should now be squarely on your front leg. You should now be seeing your golf ball soaring toward your target in a nice arcing trajectory.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/do-you-know-the-steps-of-a-golf-swing-319850.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Do you Know the Steps of a Golf Swing?

Elements of a Golf Swing

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Elements of a Golf Swing

Golfers should have a mental check list of some of the basic elements of the golf swing before attempting a shot. The golfers body alignment relative to the target is the first basic element. To do this, stand about 5 to 10 feet behind the golf ball. The golf ball should form a straight line with yourself and the intended target. Pick out some targets on the ground to help guide you such as a shadow, tuft of grass, leaf, or whatever you can find. These should be a short distance in front of and behind the golf ball that give you a straight line with you, the golf ball, and the target you are aiming at. As you get into your address position over the golf ball, keep that line on the ground to the target in your site.Visit to : http://golfclub-review.blogspot.com

Align the club face behind the ball, with the center of the club face on a direct line between the two ground targets you have selected. Grip the club with just enough tension to keep it from slipping in your hands throughout the course of the golf swing. Align your feet on a parallel plane with your ground targets, shoulder width apart, and the knees slightly bent. The front foot should be pointed slightly outward, toward the target, to allow your hips to flow freely through the swing.
Tilt your torso slightly towards the ball while keeping your back straight. The arms should now hang freely in front of the body to grip the club. The shoulders should be parallel with the ground targets and the toes, and your head should be tilted downward with your eyes on the ball. These motions described are known as the set-up, or addressing the ball.http://golfclub-review.blogspot.com
The back swing is step 4 of the golf swing. It is also known as the take away. This will be the start of the meat and potatoes of the golf swing. You want to rhythmically take the golf club back on the same plane of the straight line that your ground targets make. Make sure to keep your back elbow close to your ribs. The front elbow should be straight during the back swing. Your eyes should remain on the back of the golf ball, where you want to strike it with the golf club face. The back swing should inherently bring your chin into your front shoulder. The hips will stay quite and tilted a small amount forward. The front knee should also turn inward. At the height of the back swing, you should allow your wrists to break slightly to get ready for the next step of the golf swing.
Step 5 of the golf swing is the down swing. During this element of the golf swing, you will be bringing the golf club down toward the ball on the same plane with the line formed by the ground targets you have setup directly in front and behind the golf ball. The wrists will start uncoiling and your weight will be shifting from the back foot to the front foot. This part of the golf swing will produce the speed and force to carry the golf ball toward the target. Keep the golf club face on the target line throughout the down swing and your eyes always on the back of the golf ball. The golf club face should strike the golf ball and then the ground directly in front of where the golf ball was resting. This will take a divot out of the ground approximately where your ground target was located directly in front of where the golf ball was resting.

Finish the golf swing with a nice, high follow through of the club. Your hips should be turned toward the target. Your weight should have shifted, and should now be firmly on your front foot. Smile and watch the ball fly toward the target. http://golfclub-review.blogspot.com

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/elements-of-a-golf-swing-653149.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Elements of a Golf Swing

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Why the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Can Help Your Game

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Why the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Can Help Your Game

Since its inception in early 2007, when PGA Tour professionals like Will MacKenzie, Aaron Baddeley or former Masters champion Mike Weir started using it, the notion of the Stack and Tilt golf swing has been increasingly popular among professional players and weekend hackers alike.

The fathers of the new golf swing are swing teachers Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett, who came up with the concept after more than two decades of research. Let me quickly point out the differences between the Stack and Tilt (also abbreviated as S&T) and a conventional golf swing before I will explain why the S&T can help the average amateur player to significantly improve his game.

While the fundamental concept of a conventional golf swing is a weight shift to the back foot during the upswing, a player using the Stack and Tilt swing will place at least 60 percent of his weight on the front foot. During the swing, even more weight will be placed on the front foot resulting in an 80/20 weight distribution at the top of the backswing.

If you are struggling to consistenly make good contact with the golf ball, the Stack and Tilt golf swing can definitely lower your handicap by several strokes: The lack of weight shift and in consequence reduced body movement will make it easier to achieve a solid contact with the golf ball and will result in a more penetrating ball flight and improved consistency.

Even though players like Tiger Woods or Phil Mickelson have not yet changed to the S&T, it is certainly a concept worth a look for amateur players looking to easily improve their long game.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/why-the-stack-and-tilt-golf-swing-can-help-your-game-719104.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Why the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing Can Help Your Game

Sunday, February 1, 2009

Stack Tilt Golf Swing - the Swing That Will Change Your Game

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~the Swing That Will Change Your Game

The concept is rather easy, stack your weight and tilt to the target. The Stack & Tilt swing has convinced many, that this method holds the key to more consistency and power. But is this swing for everyone? Let's look at this swing closer and what type of golfer would most benefit.

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing innovators Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett have pioneered a concept that is truly revolutionizing the golf swing. They have rolled out a method that has convinced some of the best golfers in the world to change their bread and butter... their swing. Not an easy task! The results have been quite astounding. Many PGA players are now either using, or considering using this swing with the same thing in mind. To gain consistency and power.

For the better player, it holds many possibilities to improve the swing. But for some, it may not quite hold as much promise...

If you are thinking of trying this swing and struggle with an "outside-in" path, a problem that plagues many beginners, you may want to reconsider. A player that struggles with a fault that results in an "over the top" swing path would probably only exaggerate the problem by changing swings. You would be better off trying to correct the fault before making such drastic changes.

If you are a better player that "hangs back" and struggles with pushes and hooks, read on. This swing definitely holds opportunities for improvement.

For the better player that already has a solid foundation and only wants to gain more distance or better control for his irons, the Stack And Tilt Golf Swing may be just the ticket. The swing emphasizes the "position at impact" to help improve ball striking consistency. Because the conventional swing uses a weight shift to both sides during the swing, players very often get "caught" with their weight on the back foot. This causes mis-hits and tops.

The Stack And Tilt Golf Swing centers your weight over the ball and promotes minimal weight shift, continually remaining centered is the goal. The result is a steeper angle of attack with a flatter and more rotational swing. This provides an element of consistency, especially with irons where your angle of attack needs to be steeper.

So if you struggle with an "over the top" swing path, correct the problem before moving onto this swing methodology. If however, you are a better player that struggles with the occasional push and/or hook, you will want to seriously consider the Stack & Tilt swing. It provides you the opportunity to add an element of consistency you may not find in the conventional swing.


Article Source:
http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/stack-tilt-golf-swing-the-swing-that-will-change-your-game-624350.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~the Swing That Will Change Your Game

Learn the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Learn the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing?

Have you heard about the Stack and Tilt golf swing?

Well, thanks to two men by the names of Andy Plumber and Mike Bennett (who are currently teaching golfers their unbelievable golf swing method on and off the PGA tour) there is now a new way to swing your golf club. The stack and tilt golf swing was formed by who invented the swing "stack and tilt" to help all players find their proper golf form and to use the stack and tilt golf swing to hit the ball correctly each and every time.

Today there are over 18 pro golfers including Aaron Baddeley (who are currently playing on the PGA golf tour) that are using this type of golf swing! Why? Because they feel that they have more control over their golf swing and they are having success with it. The stack and tilt golf swing can help you drive the ball longer and will make you much more comfortable as you swing your golf club.

This method of golf swing requires you to turn your shoulders in a circle, so you always hit the ground under the ball in the exact same spot each and every time. As well as moving the shoulders the spine is moving too, the spine is tilting as you move to hit the golf ball.

This is revolutionary stuff, because we as golfers have always been told to keep the shoulders straight and not to move them. The reason why this golf swing method is called the Stand and Tilt is because your stacked up at a hips and to stay stacked your tilting your spine.

Article Source:
http://www.articlesbase.com/golf-articles/learn-the-stack-and-tilt-golf-swing-676468.html

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Learn the Stack and Tilt Golf Swing?

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing Video

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack And Tilt Golf Swing Video


Stack and Tilt Golf Swing - Click here for more home videos

Golf Life Television and Hitgolf com interview Michael Bennett the co inventor of the popular new swing on the PGA Tour The Stack and Tilt Bennett and his partner researched golf swings and body mechanics to arrive at this golf swing philosophy that has been very successful with many PGA tour professionals like Dean Wilson Mike Wier and Arron Baddeley

Stack And Tilt Golf Swing~Stack And Tilt Golf Swing Video